King/{haroh of Egypt is attributed to one of the seven great wonders of the world.

article image from BBC

  1. Further reading on the topic

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Over eight years have now passed since Jean-Pierre Houdin and his devoted wife ‘Bulle Plexiglass’ (Michelle) fused their life’s equity into a passionate architectural affair with the Great Pyramid, located on the Giza Plateau in Egypt; “A ramp theory” – an internal one; enclosed; continually winding its way up to the apex of the Great Pyramid by means of turning 90 degrees corners; encasing workman hauling blocks of stones weighing tons; using rope, cranes, sleds, scaffolds and any other means by which a hefty stone could be maneuvered; builders hollaring and lots of sweat. The energy to create such an internal ramp can be measured and defined if calculated in detail; Jean-Pierre has detailed his architectural renderings and has come up with some staggering factors. A modern high- tech French architect who had no previous yearnings of the Great Pyramid’s construction prior to his last decade of research has used his upscale mindset to configure how the Ancient Egyptian’s might have constructed their most magnanimous feat of monumental structures. Jean-Pierre’s ability to create colorful graphics tends to lead the reader to view his internal ramp construction theory as a method to get his views across as opposed to reading and reasoning his renderings, calculations and thoughtful suggestions of e.g., “intercom systems” which he claims were built deep within the Great Pyramid’s Queen’s Chamber to accommodate the builders and crews.

Image From: Robert Schoch 

2. The Great pyramid’s inner working

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The Giza pyramid complex, on the west bank of the Nile, is the most famous group of pyramids in the world. As we discussed earlier, the grandest pyramid was built for Sneferu’s son, Khufu, in 2540 B.C. The two smaller pyramids nearby were for Khufu’s son, Khafre, and his grandson, Menkaure. After this dynasty, great pyramid building stopped, probably because of the time and expense of these massive state projects.

Image From: how stuff works

3. Statue in Cario Museum

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Khufu (/ˈkf/, full name Khnum Khufu (/ˈknmˈkf/), known to the Greeks as Cheops, was an ancient Egyptian monarch who was the second pharaoh of the Fourth Dynasty, in the first half of the Old Kingdom period (26th century BC). Khufu succeeded his father Sneferu as the second king of the 4th Dynasty. He is generally accepted as having commissioned the Great Pyramid of Giza, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, but many other aspects of his reign are poorly documented.[5][10]

image from: Wikipedia

4. Statue in the Berlin Museuem

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Khufu’s full name was Khnum-Khufwy, which means ‘[the god] Khnum protect me’. He was the son of Sneferu and Queen Hetepheres I, and is believed to have had three wives. He is famous for building the Great Pyramid at Giza, one of the seven wonders of the world, but apart from this, we know very little about him. His only surviving statue is, ironically, the smallest piece of Egyptian royal sculpture ever discovered: a 7.5 cm (3 inch) high ivory statue found at Abydos.

Image from: BBC

5,  The Great Pyramid of Khufu

Great Pyramid of Giza (by David Stanley)

The Great Pyramid of Giza is a defining symbol of Egypt and the last of the ancient Seven Wonders of the World. It is located on the Giza plateau near the modern city of Cairo and was built over a twenty-year period during the reign of the king Khufu (2589-2566 BCE, also known as Cheops) of the 4th Dynasty. Until the Eiffel Tower was completed in Paris, France in 1889 CE, the Great Pyramid was the tallest structure made by human hands in the world; a record it held for over 3,000 years and one unlikely to be broken. Other scholars have pointed to the Lincoln Cathedral spire in England, built in 1300 CE, as the structure which finally surpassed the Great Pyramid in height but, still, the Egyptian monument held the title for an impressive span of time. The pyramid rises to a height of 479 feet (146 metres) with a base of 754 feet (230 metres) and is comprised of over two million blocks of stone. Some of these stones are of such immense size and weight (such as the granite slabs in the King’s Chamber) that the logistics of raising and positioning them so precisely seems an impossibility by modern standards.

Image From: ancient

6.  Climbing the Great Pyramid 18756.jpg

This book brings to life Victorian Britain’s conceptions and misconceptions of the Muslim World using a thorough investigation of varied cultural sources of the period. She discovers the prevailing representation of Muslims and Islam in the two major spheres of British influence – India and the Ottoman Empire – was reinforced by reoccurring themes: through literature and entertainment the public saw “”the Mahomedan”” as the “”noble savage””, a perception reinforced through travel writing and fiction of the “”exotic east”” and the “”Arabian Nights””.

Image From: Amazon

7. Stairway into the great pyramid

The Gallery of The Great Pyramid of Khufu at Giza

A descending passageway off of the forced entrance leads to the lowest chamber, also known as the subterranean chamber. This chamber is 79 feet below ground. Some Egyptologists believe Khufu originally intended to be buried here, but later changed his mind.

Image From: Ancient-Egypt Online

8. Small Ivory Statue of Khufu

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Khufu’s full name was Khnum-Khufwy, which means ‘[the god] Khnum protect me’. He was the son of Sneferu and Queen Hetepheres I, and is believed to have had three wives. He is famous for building the Great Pyramid at Giza, one of the seven wonders of the world, but apart from this, we know very little about him. His only surviving statue is, ironically, the smallest piece of Egyptian royal sculpture ever discovered: a 7.5 cm (3 inch) high ivory statue found at Abydos.

Image from: bbc

 

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