Learn Of the Mesopotamian King that conquered parts of the middle east of Eura-Asia in the year 1115 BC.

 

  1. Carving inside of the Palace of Tiglath Pileser

 

  1. DHEPX0.jpg

The Neo-Assyrian Empire was an Iron Age Mesopotamian empire, in existence between 911 and 609 BC,[3][4][5] and became the largest empire of the world up till that time.[6] The Assyrians perfected early techniques of imperial rule, many of which became standard in later empires,[7] and was, according to many historians, the first real empire in history.[8] The Assyrians were the first to be armed with iron weapons, and their troops employed advanced, effective military tactics.[8]

Image From: alamy

2. Carved into the rock of Gebenek- Gu

P95R2G.jpg

Tiglath Pileser I. rock relief from the source of the cave Gebenek -Gu; iglat Pilesar I. Rock relief from the spring cave of the  Gebenek-Gu

Image From: Alamy

3. Military Campaign of Tiglath-Pileser

Assyrian Battle Scene

With this massive army, Tiglath Pileser III firmly established the great expanse of the Assyrian Empire. By 736 BCE his empire encompassed the whole of Mesopotamia and the Levant, an area stretching from the Persian Gulf up to modern-day Iran, across to the Mediterranean Sea, and down through Israel. It was this empire and the idle army he would bequeath to his younger son Sargon II (722-705 BCE) founder of the Sargonid Dynasty and the greatest king of the Neo-Assyrian Empire.

Image From: ancient.edu

4. Sculpture of Tiglath Praying

P09FM8.jpg

Chamberlain of Tiglath Pileser III worshipping emblems-and inscription. Bas-relief on a limestone stele (7th BCE) from Tell Abta near Nineveh, Mesopotamia (Iraq). Location: Museum of Oriental Antiquities, Istanbul, Turkey.

Image From: Alamy

5. Capture of Damascus

The capture of Damascus in 732 BC by Tiglath-Pileser III.  Tiglath-Pileser III, king of Assyria 745–727 BC, who introduced advanced civil, military, and political systems into the Neo-Assyrian Empire.  From Hutchinson's History of the Nations, published 1915. Rights-managed stock photo

The capture of Damascus in 732 BC by Tiglath-Pileser III. Tiglath-Pileser III, king of Assyria 745–727 BC, who introduced advanced civil, military, and political systems into the Neo-Assyrian Empire. From Hutchinson’s History of the Nations, published 1915.

Image From: dissolve

6. Tiglath-Pileser Slaying a Lion

Файл:Tiglath-pileser-slaying-a-lion-tiglath-pileser-i-king-of-assyria-during-K2J148.jpg

Tiglath-Pileser slaying a lion. Tiglath-Pileser I, king of Assyria during the Middle Assyrian period (1114–1076 BC). After the painting by Margaret Dovaston, (1884-1954). From Hutchinson’s History of the Nations, published 1915

Image From: Alamy 

7. Inscriptions of Tiglath-Pileser

Summary statement number seven dates to 729 BC and reads: “In all the countries which… [I received] the tribute of… Jehoahaz (this is Ahaz with a theophoric prefix attached) of Judah…(consisting of) gold, silver, tin, iron, antimony, linen garments with multicolored trimmings….”

Image From: theosophical

8. Birth of the Neo-Assyrian Empire

The Birth and Conquest of the Neo-Assyrian Empire

The Neo-Assyrian kingdom (934–609 b.c.e.) began with Ashur-dan II, who resumed regular military campaigns abroad after more than a century of neglect. He and his successors focused their attacks on the Aramaeans to recover areas formerly occupied by the Middle Assyrian empire. Adad-nirari II set the precedent for a “show of strength” campaign, an official procession displaying Assyria’s military power, which marched around the empire and collected tribute from the surrounding kingdoms. This monarch also installed an effective network of supply depots to provision the Assyrian army en route to distant campaigns.

image From: about-history

9. wall of the throne room

The Assyrian king Tiglath Pileser III of the late 8th century BC was an exceptional military commander who forged a professional army and expanded his Empire through warfare. A scene from the palace at Nimrud shows one of his attacks on a foreign city to the west, which may have been part of his campaign against the Northern Kingdom of Israel and King Pekah. Tiglath Pileser III and his army were victorious against several cities, took captives, and imposed tribute upon Israel. A few years later,
The Assyrian king Tiglath Pileser III of the late 8th century BC was an exceptional military commander who forged a professional army and expanded his Empire through warfare. A scene from the palace at Nimrud shows one of his attacks on a foreign city to the west, which may have been part of his campaign against the Northern Kingdom of Israel and King Pekah. Tiglath Pileser III and his army were victorious against several cities, took captives, and imposed tribute upon Israel. A few years later, the capital city of Samaria was besieged and conquered, and the Kingdom of Israel was completely defeated and dissolved into the Assyrian Empire. 2 Kings 
Image From: instagram

9. Unstoppable Force of Tiglath-Pilsener

cropped-3f83585e

We have to acknowledge that TPIII’s predecessors accomplished a lot with what all armies were at the time: essentially part-time and made up of mostly farmers during their off-seasons and mercenaries. As the Assyrian empire grew, however, so did its internal problems and need for a full-time force to protect its interests from within as well as without.

image From: allmesopotmia

10. Statue of Tiglath-Pileser

Image FRom: caroun

11. Rock Carving of Tiglath-Pileser

King Pul

One of the first things he did as king was to divide the larger provinces of his kingdom. He appointed Assyrian administrators loyal to him in these areas, and they worked directly over the local provincial governors who now had limited powers. This was done so everything the conquered people did was reported to Tiglath-Pileser and this system prevented rebellions even before they started.

Image From: amazingbibletimeline

12. Pains of War as Tiglath-Pileser marches people away from Isreal

Damascus and Israel tried to organize resistance against him, to this end, they marched against Judah to force its participation in the fight against Assyria, the Judahite king Ahaz (735–720 B.C.) instead called on Assyria for protection; In 733 Tiglath-pileser devastated Israel and forced it to surrender large territories, captives were taken and tribute had to be paid. In 732 he advanced upon Damascus, first devastating the gardens outside the city and then conquering the capital and killing the king, whom he replaced with a governor.

Image From: realhistoryww.com

13. Tiglath-Pileser III stands over an enemy

Formerly the governor of Kalhu (Biblical Calah/Nimrud)[3] and a general, the usurper Pulu assumed his Assyrian throne-name (Tiglath-Pileser) from two more-legitimate predecessors. He described himself as a son of Adad-nirari III in his inscriptions, but the accuracy of this claim remains uncertain. He seized the throne in the midst of the l war on 13 Ayaru, 745 BCE.[1][7] As a result of Pulu seizing the throne in a bloody coup d’état, the old royal family was slaughtered,[3] and the new monarch set Assyria on the path to expand the empire in order to ensure the survival of the kingdom.[3]

Image From: wikipedia

 14. Tiglath-Pileser being driven by horses

Alabaster wall panel relief: the text on this panel describes a campaign in the north, but the upper composition represented a campaign in the west, and the name of the town represented, Astartu, is given in a caption at the top. Astartu is shown as a typical Middle Eastern fortress town, built on top of a mound which probably covered the remains of much older settlements. There are towers at intervals along the walls, and a high town gate; inside, at the top on the left, is a building with an arched entrance, perhaps the citadel. The town has just been captured and its inhabitants are being marched away. An Assyrian soldier waving a mace escorts four prisoners, who carry their possessions in sacks over their shoulders. Their clothes and their turbans, rising to a slight point which flops backwards, are typical of the area; people from the Biblical kingdom of Israel, shown on other sculptures, wear the same dress. Above them a second Assyrian soldier is driving two fat-tailed sheep. Further to the right they would have met the Assyrian king, reviewing his troops and their booty.    In the lower register, the king Tiglath-pileser III himself appears in a chariot under his tasselled state parasol, which is held by a eunuch. He wears the royal hat, somewhat higher than the ninth-century type, and a fringed robe. His right hand is raised, while his left holds a flower. His chariot is larger than the ninth-century type, with a quiver at the front,  and the wheels have eight spokes rather than six. The patterns on the cloth hanging between the front of the chariot and the yoke include a winged disc, a solar symbol of great significance throughout the Ancient Near East. The charioteer holds three reins, but two horses are actually shown  drawing  the chariot, gaily caparisoned and led by a pair of grooms wearing quivers. The one man visible in the poorly preserved chariot to the right once held a pole with a circular ornament on top;  this was one of the sacred standards which accompanied the Assyrians into battle.    This slab is inscribed.

Alabaster wall panel relief: the text on this panel describes a campaign in the north, but the upper composition represented a campaign in the west, and the name of the town represented, Astarte, is given in a caption at the top. Astartu is shown as a typical Middle Eastern fortress town, built on top of a mound which probably covered the remains of much older settlements. There are towers at intervals along the walls, and a high town gate; inside, at the top on the left, is a building with an arched entrance, perhaps the citadel. The town has just been captured and its inhabitants are being marched away. An Assyrian soldier waving a mace escorts four prisoners, who carry their possessions in sacks over their shoulders. Their clothes and their turbans, rising to a slight point which flops backward, are typical of the area; people from the Biblical kingdom of Israel, shown on other sculptures, wear the same dress. Above them,a second Assyrian soldier is driving two fat-tailed sheep. Further to the right, hey would have met the Assyrian king, reviewing his troops and their booty. In the lower register, the king Tiglath-pileser III himself appears in a chariot under his tasseled state parasol, which is held by a eunuch. He wears the royal hat, somewhat higher than the ninth-century type, and a fringed robe. His right hand is raised, while his left holds a flower. His chariot is larger than the ninth-century type, with a quiver at the front, and the wheels have eight spokes rather than six. The patterns on the cloth hanging between the front of the chariot and the yoke include a winged disc, a solar symbol of great significance throughout the Ancient Near East. The charioteer holds three reins, but two horses are actually shown drawing the chariot, gaily caparisoned and led by a pair of grooms wearing quivers. The one man visible in the poorly preserved chariot to the right once held a pole with a circular ornament on top; this was one of the sacred standards which accompanied the Assyrians into battle. This slab is inscribed.

Image From: Britishmuseum

15. Relief From Heavy Fighting

Assyrian Warriors Relief

According to the historian Gwendolyn Leick, Tiglath Pileser I “was one of the most important Assyrian kings of this period, largely because of his wide-ranging military campaigns, his enthusiasm for building projects, and his interest in cuneiform tablet collections…He also issued a legal decree, the so-called Middle Assyrian Laws” (171). These laws prevented the king as the administrator of the will of the gods – which was no different from earlier law codes such as the Code of Hammurabi – but the severity of their punishments was far greater. In these laws, as in every aspect of his reign, Tiglath Pileser I focused on a policy best expressed by the phrase of the later Latin poet Lucius Accius: Oderint Dum Metuant – Let them hate, so long as they fear (a line made infamous by the Roman emperor Caligula). Not only were the penalties severe, however, but they also seemed especially so for women.

Image From: Ancient.eu

 

Advertisements